Many people work in a tightly controlled environment. Every change requires a change control form and approval to make a change. In some environments, things are more lax, but you still wish you could tell when certain changes were made. That is even true in some of those tightly controlled environments. You know what I am talking about. Despite the controls in place there always seems to be some change that is unknown or even some cowboy that makes changes as s/he sees fit and forgets to notify people or follow process.

Then come the times when you are new to an environment and you really need to know some basic information about the servers you have just inherited. Well, truth be told, you don’t necessarily have to be new to a job to inherit some new servers. Sometimes, blackbox servers end up getting dropped into your realm of responsibility.

When you run into something like this, you really need to have some means to figure out what changed, when it changed and who changed it. Having that information as a base, you would then have the tools to inquire as to why it might have been changed. One of the things that would be nice to know is around the trace flags that can be enabled in SQL Server. There are trace flags (or knobs) for so many different things within SQL Server that it would be nice to get a handle on them if they do happen to be enabled or even disabled.

To continue reading, please visit the original article here.