MS Powershell“Major Changes Coming from Microsoft Will Impact Your Career.” That was the headline from an article we encountered on Facebook recently.

Turns out one of the changes makes PowerShell rather important: Windows Server 2016 Nano Server won’t support video connections or have a GUI. In the words of Don Jones, Pluralsight Curriculum Director, “It’s PowerShell or bust. How many of you have administrators [and] server admins who are not comfortable with PowerShell? That’s a limiting career decision. You’re still going to have GUIs. Even Nano has a GUI. Nano is actually going to offer a Web-based GUI, potentially even in the cloud, that connects to the actual Nano server via PowerShell remoting. They are not going to run on the server.”

That’s a decent argument for learning PowerShell, but Jones goes even further: “If you’re not doing anything with PowerShell already…you’ve kind of missed the boat. PS has gone from a curve to a giant block, and it’s a lot to learn, if you can devote enough time you can still learn this tech. But, my god, don’t wait any longer.”

Jones also spoke up for Desired State Configuration, calling it “the most important management service that Microsoft has ever created.”

Regardless of how you feel about PowerShell and DSC, here is yet another impassioned plea for us in the IT world to stay current and not get complacent in learning new stuff.

Randy Knight recently blogged about the idea of just showing up—how the workplace is about making a contribution and refining your skills—and not long ago I blogged about taking advantage of training events.

So, with Mr. Jones’ call to arms ringing in our ears, we encourage you to take advantage of the opportunities to learn PowerShell.